Tuesday, August 02, 2005

Noimutti - West Timor - NTT


Usif Pah Don Antonio da Costa of Noimutti.
Timor (since 19??)
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3 comments:

Raja Muda Kuno said...

There was in ca. 1915 an argument,if Noimutti was a part of OEcussi Ambeno;attached to it by a corrdor;or an enclave in W.-Timor.The solution was made it was the last explanation.So it became a part of Dutch-Timor officially in 1916.Made part of Miomaffo principality,with which it had no ties.Noimutti was a sort of churchstate;founded by the Roman Catholic Portugese church.The rule of the Rajas were replaced by the church.Ca. 1800 there was a short rule of a Sonbai prince.When the Portugese removed their central rule from OEcusse Embeno area to Dili,the government influence of the church also became lesser.A brother of the Liurai of OEcusse Ambeno;greatgrandfather of the presaent Raja;became the first Raja of Noimutti of the da Costa dynasty.In the Dutch time the Dutch choss to let Noimutti be ruled by the Fettor(vice-Raja)dynasty of N.:the Salems,because the da Costa's were considered as being to much pro-Portugese..Later the Raja dynasty came back shortly before the WW II.Later on (after WW II)the Salems began again the actual rulers ofthe area,but the da Costa's remained as the Raja-dynasty.The present Raja is not installed officially,but you could name him Raja anyway.

Hans Hagerdal said...

Noemuti is first mention in 1702. The first real governor of Portuguese Timor, António Coelho Guerreiro, sent his men from Lifau (Oecusse Ambeno) to Noemuti to ensure its obedience, but met with resistance. The Noemutiers preferred to back the mestizo group on Timor (the Topasses or Black Portuguese) who were enemies with the governor. After 1749 Noemuti became the main military stronghold of the Black Portuguese, and successfully resisted Dutch incursions. The Dutch resident von Plüskow tried to invest the place in 1759 with a large army, but had to give up the attempt. A member of the leading Topass family da Costa, António da Costa, was raja of Noemuti in the 1760s and 1770s. Later, in the 1780s, a Portuguese padre called Francisco de São Joze Foscana governed Noemuti and smuggled weapons to Timorese rebels against Dutch rule. A new line of da Costa rajas was then established in the late 19th century.

Hans Hagerdal said...

Noemuti is first mentioned in the contemporary sources in 1702. In that year, the first real governor of Portuguese Timor, António Coelho Guerreiro, sent his men from Lifau (Oecusse Ambeno) to Noemuti to ensure its obedience, but met with resistance. The Noemutiers preferred to back the mestizo group on Timor (the Topasses or Black Portuguese) who were enemies with the governor. After 1749 Noemuti became the main military stronghold of the Black Portuguese, and successfully resisted Dutch incursions. The enraged Dutch referred to this place as "het roofnest Naymoetie". The Dutch resident von Plüskow tried to invest the place in 1759 with a large army, but had to give up the attempt in spite of the use of artillery that had been brought uphill with great effort. A member of the leading Topass family da Costa, António da Costa, was raja of Noemuti in the 1760s and 1770s, and was one of the Topasses resonsible for murdering von Plüskow on the beach of Lifau in 1761. Later, in the 1780s, a Portuguese padre called Francisco de São Joze Foscana governed Noemuti and smuggled weapons to Timorese rebels against Dutch rule. A new line of da Costa rajas was then established in the late 19th century. An undatable figure in the history of Noemuti is Louis Sonba'i, a prince of the well-known Sonba'i dynasty of West Timor. He was set up as raja of Noemuti when his own father had been murdered in Bijela (11-12 km from Noemuti) - the genealogies seem to suggest the 18th century. His body lay unburied for centuries, until 1957. Louis Sonba'i's grave is venerated in a rather un-Catholic manner by the Timorese, to the great irritation of the local priests.